PhD in progress

/PhD in progress
PhD in progress 2018-10-15T09:28:28+00:00

Theodora Oikonomidi
Thesis started in 2018

Theodora Oikonomidi

Exploring opportunities for the personalization of digital behavior change interventions

Supervisors : Philippe Ravaud and Viet-Thi Tran

We will identify ways to optimize digital behavior change interventions. We will explore patient perceptions regarding the intrusiveness and acceptability of digital tools and we will examine different behavioral frameworks for the personalization of digital behavior change interventions, producing relevant recommendations for intervention development.

Astrid Chevance
Thesis started in 2017

Astrid Chevance

New methods for the development of Core Outcome Set (COS): proof of concept with the example of Major Depressive Disorder

Supervisors : Philippe Ravaud and Viet-Thi Tran

We propose methods for COS development, allowing the implementation of patient’s, carer’s, clinician’s, and researcher’s preferences on outcomes, based on international surveys, taking the example of Major Depressive Disorder (unipolar) in adults (18-65 years old). Different degrees of stakeholder’s involvement will be defined for each stage of the research process. Finally we will be able to propose a ready-to-use COS for depression and useful methods for developing COS in other disease.

Click here to participate to the first step of the study : it is a survey about the expectations for treatment of depression

Justine Jacot
Thesis started in 2017

Justine Jacot

Identification of optimal treatment regimes (OTRs) for a survival restricted outcome

Supervisor : Raphaël Porcher

We will develop methods for estimating OTRs in oncology from a counterfactual approach of the individual restricted survival time on RCTs and observational data. These approaches are going to be compared with other published methods in order to have their statistical power. Finally, we plan to extend the developped methods to data with time-depending covariates.

Arthur James
Thesis started in 2017

Arthur James

Development of a method to identifying consensual criteria for long-term evaluation : the example of severe trauma

Supervisors : Philippe Ravaud and Viet-THi Tran

First of all, during a systematic review we identify the themes currently favored by authors. Then we will conduct a survey of severely traumatized patients to identify the areas that are critical to them. Finally, we will achieve a consensus between patients and clinicians that will define what elements must be primarily described to assess a serious long-term trauma.

Lorenzo Bertizzolo
Thesis started in 2016

Lorenzo Bertizzolo

Improving the assessment of Risk of Bias in Systematic Reviews

Supervisors : Agnès Dechartres and Patrick Bossuyt

Evaluating the Risk of Bias (RoB) of a study is a very important passage while conducting a Systematic Review and evaluating research. The RoB is the main determinant of the internal validity of study, which is one of the most important aspects of it. The validity of a study represents how well it reflects the reality it is trying to describe. This project aims to evaluate the reproducibility of the RoB assessment, explore its importance on the results of studies and propose ways to improve the understanding, use and dissemination of “measuring tools” for the Risk of Bias assessment.

Alice Bigane
Thesis started in 2016

Alice Biggane

Methods for including participants in core outcome set development

Supervisors : Paula Williamson and Philippe Ravaud

Participants such as health professionals and patients are increasingly contributing to the development of core outcome sets. However, the best methods for facilitating this participation remains unknown. Thus, this mixed- methods project aims to provide guidance on the methods used to ensure participation is as meaningful as possible.

Mona Ghannad
Thesis started in 2016

Mona Ghannad

An alternative approach for planning the research of innovative medical tests

Supervisors : Patrick Bossuyt and Isabelle Boutron

Accurate presentation of the results of clinical research is the cornerstone of the dissemination of the results and their implementation in clinical practice. The aim of this project is to identify, develop and evaluate strategies for preventing, eliminating, or limiting “spin” in clinical research. “Spin” can be defined as specific reporting that could distort the interpretation of results and mislead readers. The most disturbing form would be to suggest that health care interventions are beneficial, despite the absence of convincing evidence. Such “spin” has been documented in the reporting of RCTs, diagnostic accuracy studies, systematic reviews, and other forms of evaluation.

Linda Nyanchoka
Thesis started in 2016

Linda Nyanchoka

Methods of identifying gaps in clinical research

Supervisors : Raphaël Porcher and Catrin Tudur Smith

A research gap is defined as a topic area which missing or insufficient information limits the ability to reach a conclusion for a question. Identification of research gaps has the potential to inform the design and conduct of research, evidence-based decision-making, health policies, and practice. Audiences including the public, patients, researchers, clinicians, advocacy groups, and funders can benefit from understanding the current status of research and research gaps in a field. This project aims to identify, describe and classify methods to identify and display gaps in clinical research and develop methodological guidance.

Tat Thang Vo
Thesis started in 2017

Tat Thang Vo

Novel approach for meta-analysis: a causality framework

Supervisors : Catrin Tudur Smith and Raphaël Porcher

Standard methodology for meta-analysis is focusing too much on deriving a summary treatment effect but remains implicit about the patient population for which this summary result is described. We aims at developing a new meta-analysis technique for RCTs, which will estimate the treatment effect for each of the populations in the considered trials by combining the information across all studies.

Van Nguyen Thu
Thesis started in 2016

Van Nguyen

Impact of mobilising collective intelligence in clinical research planning

Supervisors : Isabelle Boutron and Bridget Young

A new method is needed to tackle the challenges that clinical research planning is facing. We investigate whether and how collective intelligence is applied to transform clinical research planning.

Youri Yordanov
Thesis started in 2013

Avoidable Waste of research in clinical trials

Supervisors : Philippe Ravaud and Agnès Dechartres

Jean-David Zeitoun
Thesis started in 2013

Jean-David Zeitoun

Innovation and pharmaceutical development

Supervisor : Philippe Ravaud

Post-marketing trials are paramount for enhancing evidence about novel medicines once they are used at a massive scale

We systematically studied all post-marketing trials conduceted at a global scale for a consistent sample of novel medicines approved by the two leading regulators

We found extreme variations in the way medicines were studied after approval.